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Outdoor Heritage

California salmon begin migration by truck

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The truck connects to a 10-inch diameter aluminum tube, which shoots the salmon across the pier into one of three white net pens suspended in an aluminum pontoon barge. Then the pens are opened on an outgoing tide, allowing the salmon to continue their downstream migration to the sea on their own. The National Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation plan to expand holding capacity at Livingston-Stone Hatchery, located at Shasta Dam, and bring in water chillers.

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Fish Game needs volunteers to plant bitterbrush

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…sagebrush winter range over hundreds of acres in Southwest Idaho. Volunteers have planted nearly three quarters of a million bitterbrush and sagebrush seedlings during the past 24 years, and saved F hundreds of thousands of dollars in planting costs, said Evin Oneale, regional conservation educator in the Fish and Game’s office in Nampa. Bitterbrush and sagebrush are native shrubs in Idaho, and throughout the West. They are important food for big game and other wildlife during…

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IDFG Upper Snake Region Honors Volunteers

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Photo of Idaho Fish & Game 2013 Volunteer award recipients (Top Left) Dave Godfrey, Jerry Steed, Ken Olson, Bill Steinke, Carolyn Bishop, Alan Crocket, Tony Appelhans, Sam Pole, (Bottom Left) Al Yonk, Collett Olson, Harold Jones, Mary Dolven, James Brower, Robert Anderl. IDAHO FALLS – The Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG) announces Ken and Collett Olson as the Volunteers of the Year for 2013 in the Upper Snake Region. As a couple, Ken and Collett provided the IDFG with over 800 hours of volunteer service in the year 2013. “I have really gotten to know these two during my last three years with the Department.” says James Brower, the Volunteer Service Coordinator for the region. “Ken and Collett…

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Fewer conservation grants for land that doesn’t allow hunting

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…landowners interested in easements have grown wary, the Natural Heritage Land Trust’s Welsh said. Acquiring easements is a crucial method of preserving wildlife habitat at low cost without removing land from tax rolls, Welsh said. But many owners won’t give up the right to decide who fires guns or sets traps on their land, Welsh said. “They want to control the type of hunter who hunts on their property,” Welsh said. “When you open your land to public hunting, you don’t…

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