Category

Wolves

Mexico reports 1st litter of wolf cubs in the wild

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…in the wild in Mexico.The Mexican gray wolf was almost wiped out in the U.S. Southwest by the same factors that eliminated it in Mexico: hunting, trapping and poisoning.The last five survivors in the U.S. were captured between 1977 and 1980, and then bred in captivity. The first wolves were re-introduced into the wild in the Southwest starting in 1998, mainly in Arizona and New Mexico.The Mexican gray wolf remains an…

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Scientists use CSI-ish tests to count Alaska packs

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For years that chore meant trapping the elusive wolves and fitting them with tracking collars, then flying circles above the canopy of spruce and hemlocks in hopes of sighting a pack. Tough to trap and rarely seen, the animals are notoriously hard to count. The hair-snaring tactic could one day reduce the need for flying, which Logan said is expensive, prone to weather delays and sometimes dangerous.

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Wolf War Renews as Big Money Flows

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The year before, they killed 90 cattle and 251 sheep across the state. In the Wood River Valley alone, wolves killed 34 cattle and 79 sheep in 2012. Last year, they killed 23 cattle and 146 sheep. In response, 94 wolves were killed from helicopters, up from 73 in 2012. But the money was not enough to pay ranchers market rates.

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EDITORIAL: Caution needed on wolf hunt

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Moreover, the state’s original goal of having 350 of the animals is outdated and needs updating. But many don’t survive for a variety of reasons, some natural. Staunch opponents of Wisconsin’s wolf hunt don’t want any animals shot and killed. But northern Wisconsin residents deserve some protection for their livestock and pets.

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How to find a wolf: Scientists use CSI-style tests to count Alaska packs

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For years that chore meant trapping the elusive wolves and fitting them with tracking collars, then flying circles above the canopy of spruce and hemlocks in hopes of sighting a pack. Tough to trap and rarely seen, the animals are notoriously hard to count. The hair-snaring tactic could one day reduce the need for flying, which Logan said is expensive, prone to weather delays and sometimes dangerous.

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